Sunday, March 07, 2010

Trees lose ground overnight in city

Trees lose ground overnight in city
AMIT S. UPADHYE


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Surgery is some- times required to give a tree a chance at surviving for a longer period. If a branch is infected, experts can either use chemicals to remove the infec- tion or cut the branch so that the tree itself remains safe.

The last few sur March 6: The last few sur- viving trees on Indiranagar 100 Feet Road are being hacked for no reason other than to provide a better view of the many upmarket shop- ping complexes on the thor- oughfare. The branches of several Gulmohar trees on either side of the road have been clandestinely chopped at night to avoid public out- cry. While environmental- ists fear the unscientific cut- ting could harm the trees, causing them to tilt over and fall, BBMP appears not to be bothered at all.
“The trees are cut so unscientifically that they are unlikely to survive heavy rain and winds,” said a passerby, pointing out that many trees in the city have become unstable due to the so-called pruning by the authorities.

The latest loss in tree cover is only destroying more of Indiranagar’s green ambience and adding to its commercialisation.

Over the past four years, over 30 residents of 100 Feet Road have moved out as they could not tolerate the rising number of commercial establishments in their neighbourhood.

Upset environmentalists say although they have been suggesting the use of mod- ern tree-saving technologies such as tree-surgery in the city to protect what is left of its green cover, the authori- ties seem not to care.

“Surgery is sometimes required to give a tree a chance at surviving for a longer period. If a branch is infected, experts can either use chemicals to remove the infection or cut the branch so that the tree itself remains safe,” explains S.G.

Neginal, a retired forest officer. Nature lovers like him say that several depart-

ments prune or bring down trees without authorisation from tree experts and damage them in the process.
"BBMP, which is expected to conduct regular checks on trees and their health, is more concerned about tending to the timber lobby. Also while it has given permission for the felling of 1,600 large trees in the past 24 months, most attempts at translocation have failed in city," an environmentalist says.

"If this situation continues we will see trees only in pots," Mr Neginhal warns.

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